Advising

Making Appointments with Advising

Questions? Please refer to our FAQ page here!

NOTE: Please see the “Advising in Fall 2020” tab to your left for online appointment and drop-in availability during the Fall 2020 semester.

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  1. Log in with your UIC username and password.
  2. Use the Appointment Tab or Request an Appointment.
  3. Select Appointment Type.
  4. Select the date and time that best fits your schedule.

Note: Appointment requests may be made up to 36 hours to 3 weeks in advance.  Appointments cannot be scheduled beyond 3 weeks from your request date.

NOTE: Please see the “Advising in Fall 2020” tab to your left for online appointment and drop-in availability during the Fall 2020 semester.

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Advisors accept appointments only on:

  • Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday
  • From 9:00 am to 12:00 pm or 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Once you’ve made an appointment —

  • You may cancel or reschedule your appointment with at least 24 hours notice.
  • All appointments are located in Science and Engineering South building, Room 3272.
  • Questions? Call the Biology, IHS, and Neuroscience Undergraduate Advising Center located in 3272 SES: (312) 996-2211
  • For all issues related to course registration overrides, please email biosciadvising@uic.edu
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** NOTE: Please see the “Advising in Fall 2020” tab to your left for online appointment and drop-in availability during the Fall 2020 semester.

 

Drop-In Advising is available every Tuesday. Be sure to bring your iCard with you.

  • 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Degree audits and course planning are NOT done during walk-in advising. The only exception we make is for students who are entering their final semester at UIC. If you are not entering your final semester and would like to course plan, please make an appointment.

Dentistry students practicing skills on dummies

Students seeking advising in Pre-Health should visit UIC’s Pre-Health Professions website.

There are three types of courses being offered this fall.

1. Online Asynchronous

What this means: An online course where there are no mandatory set meeting times using video conferencing technology. The course might have optional set meeting times, where attendance is encouraged but not required, these will be recorded for students unable to attend.  Students use Blackboard to participate in online learning activities each week. Coursework is completed on students’ own time while still meeting deadlines

2. Online Synchronous

What this means: An online course in which students use video conferencing technologies (such as Blackboard Collaborate, Zoom etc.) to join class at set meeting times each week.  Blackboard may be used for students to participate in online learning activities.

3. On Campus

What this means: A course that, primarily, though perhaps not entirely, will meet on campus with the aid of video conferencing technologies and social distancing strategies employed in order to maintain a safe and healthy learning environment.

Students, Please review the Course Descriptions for each of your BIOS courses so you know more about the course structure, requirements for the course and whether the course will be on campus.  Please see the here for examples.

The vast majority of our course offerings will be conducted remotely, either synchronously or asynchronously. Below is a chart that details the courses which will be held on campus and whether attendance in person will be required.

Please note that there are courses for which attendance is required and that do not have a separate on-line track. Do not register for these classes unless you are able to attend in person. There is no separate remote track. Consult your advisor if this course is required for you to graduate in the fall.

In-Person Course information

Course Number Attendance: Required or Optional Instructor
310 Required - most weeks Chong
312 Required - most weeks Linn
351 OPTIONAL on-campus lab sessions will be offered during the first half of the semester. Attendance on-campus is NOT REQUIRED. This lab may be completed fully online in an asynchronous format. A computer and reliable internet access are required. Lab coats, goggles, gloves are required for the optional on-campus sessions and will be provided. Contact instructor for questions about the course: amario3@uic.edu McGinley
420 Required but only for a small number of weeks Lynch
482 All the lectures given on Monday will be online synchronous. For the lab practices given on Wednesday, half will be online synchronous, and half will be in person. But the TA will make those "in-person" lab practices online synchronous as well so people who can't come in person can still do online synchronously. Chang
486 Recommended but instructor is amenable to having students attend remotely Park

Fall 2020 Course Descriptions

Bios 120 (Molumby): Introduction to Populations and Communities

  • Course Description: This course is an intensive introduction to ecology, biodiversity, and evolutionary biology.  The scientific principles by which the basic units of these sciences – populations, communities, ecosystems, and species, are investigated in termess of the interdependent biosphere in which we live.   Topics include: Scientific skills, evolution, Mendelian and population genetics, biological diversity, conservation biology, and human impact.
  • This course is fully online and asynchronous, including exams, and there are no on campus meeting times. Laboratory classes will not meet on campus.  Lab exercises will be conducted by students, on their own time.  Students will need a meter stick and access to a small patch of green lawn.  Lectures will be recorded and posted on Blackboard. Students are encouraged to view them at a time convenient for them.Sessions will be held at the specified lecture time (Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 10:30-11:00)to review content and encourage student interaction. Office hours with your instructor and teaching assistants will take place through an online conference system, such as Blackboard Collaborate or Zoom, and are not required.

 

BIOS 220 (Morrison, McCutcheon & Stone): Mendelian and Molecular Genetics

  • Course Description: This course in genetics has two major themes. One is transmission genetics. This includes the distribution of genetic information into gametes, transmission to the offspring, the interactions of members of gene pairs in the production of a trait, and gene mapping. The emphasis in this section of the course will be the integration of basic concepts and analytic thinking. The readings and lecture material provide the background and a first level of understanding in genetics. The other theme deals with biochemical and molecular genetics. This section of the course places emphasis on how genetic information is stored, transmitted, altered and expressed. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in these genetic processes has generated new approaches to research disease diagnosis and treatment, and applications to agriculture and industry. The material in this section of the course represents a work in progress, and new information is generated on this theme every day.
  • Lectures for this course are online and asynchronous. Lectures will be recorded in advance by your instructors, and posted in Bb on a regular weeklyschedule: one lecture on Mondays and another lecture on Tuesdays.The lectures will develop basic concepts in genetics, and areprovided as a guide to help in your study of assigned textbook chapters. Most lectures will contain embedded pop-up quizzes, which must be completed during the first 24 hours of availability of each lecture.
  • Discussion sections for this course are online and synchronous. There are weekly scheduled discussionsection meetings. These provide you with an opportunity to ask questions and to discussthe assigned problems. The section meetings will also be used to give quizzes and for review sessions. There will be 10 unannounced quizzes given in the discussion sections, each worth 10 grade points.

BIOS 230 (Nelson): Evolution and Ecology

  • This course is fully online and asynchronous, including exams, and there are no on-campus meeting times. Lectures will be recorded and posted on Blackboard. Students are encouraged to view them at a time convenient for them. Optional Q A sessions will be held at the specified lecture time (Tuesdays, Thursdays) to review content and encourage student interaction. Drop-In hours with the instructor will take place through Blackboard Collaborate and are not required. There are two required textbooks, both are available through the UIC Bookstore.
  • The coursework portion of this class, including exams, will be presented online on Blackboard.  Students are required to have a computer with a secure and reliable internet connection. Students must have the most up to date version of their Internet browser, Chrome or Firefox, on their computer along with a functioning webcam.The fully online format for BIOS 230 offers flexibility for students who are self-disciplined, organized, able to meet deadlines, and who work independently. Students must have college level reading and writing skills.Students need an active UIC email account and the following skills:
    • Create and open Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, or PDF documents
    • Upload documents with a Microsoft Word or PDF attachment
    • Navigate the Blackboard discussion board, create original threads, and reply to peers
    • Effectively manage computer files and folders (copy, save, back up, etc.)
    • View videos on Blackboard, YouTube, and Panopto
    • Use Blackboard Collaborate to meet virtually with faculty or teaching assistants

BIOS 236 (Nelson): Animal Behavior

  • This course is fully online and largely asynchronous, including exams, and there are no on-campus meeting times. Lectures will be recorded and posted on Blackboard. Students are encouraged to view them at a time convenient for them. There will be 3-5 group activities that will meet during the specified lecture time (Tuesdays, Thursdays 2:00-3:15).  You will be notified in advance when these group projects will occur.  Optional Q A sessions will be held weekly during the scheduled lecture time to review content and answer questions. Drop-In hours with the instructor will take place through Blackboard Collaborate and are not required.
  • The coursework portion of this class, including exams, will be presented online on Blackboard.  Students are required to have a computer with a secure and reliable internet connection. Students must have the most up to date version of their Internet browser, Chrome or Firefox, on their computer along with a functioning webcam.The online format for BIOS 236 offers flexibility for students who are self-disciplined, organized, able to meet deadlines, and who work independently. Students must have college level reading and writing skills.Students need an active UIC email account and the following skills:
    • Create and open Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, or PDF documents
    • Upload documents with a Microsoft Word or PDF attachment
    • Navigate the Blackboard discussion board, create original threads, and reply to peers
    • Effectively manage computer files and folders (copy, save, back up, etc.)
    • View videos on Blackboard, YouTube, and Panopto
    • Use Blackboard Collaborate to meet virtually with other students for group discussions

BIOS 294 (Nelson): Conservation Biology

  • This course is fully online and synchronous, and there are no on-campus meeting times. Lectures will be recorded and posted on Blackboard. Students are encouraged to view them at a time convenient for them. There will be weekly required group activities that will meet during the specified lecture time (Tuesdays, Thursdays 3:30-4:45).  You are expected to attend and participate in these group discussions.  Optional Q A sessions will be held weekly during the scheduled lecture time to review content and answer questions. Drop-In hours with the instructor will take place through Blackboard Collaborate and are not required
  • The coursework portion of this class, including exams, will be presented online on Blackboard.  Students are required to have a computer with a secure and reliable internet connection. Students must have the most up to date version of their Internet browser, Chrome or Firefox, on their computer along with a functioning webcam.The online format for BIOS 294 offers flexibility for students who are self-disciplined, organized, able to meet deadlines, and who work independently. Students must have college level reading and writing skills.Students need an active UIC email account and the following skills:
    • Create and open Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint, or PDF documents
    • Upload documents with a Microsoft Word or PDF attachment
    • Navigate the Blackboard discussion board, create original threads, and reply to peers
    • Effectively manage computer files and folders (copy, save, back up, etc.)
    • View videos on Blackboard, YouTube, and Panopto
    • Use Blackboard Collaborate to meet virtually with other students for group discussions

    Any student requiring additional assistance may contact the UIC learning technology solutions at LTS@uic.edu.

BIOS 294 (Molumby): Insect Evolution and Biodiversity

  • Course Description: This course is an intensive overview of the evolution, ecology, and biodiversity of insects.  Special attention will be given to interactions between humans and insects; including insects as natural enemies of impacts, insects as indicators of biodiversity, and insects as pollinators.
  • This course is fully online and asynchronous, including exams, and there are no on campus meeting times.  Lectures will be recorded and posted on Blackboard. Students are encouraged to view them at a time convenient for them.Sessions will be held at the specified lecture time (Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 1:00-1:50)to review content and encourage student interaction. Office hours with the instructor  will take place through Blackboard Collaborate or Zoom, and are not required.

BIOS 343 (Molumby & Daemicke): Animal Physiological Systems

  • Course Description: This course presents students with a background in the principles by which animals carry out the physiological processes consistent with survival and reproduction, and evolve in the face of constantly changing environments.
  • This course is fully online and asynchronous, including exams, and there are no on campus meeting times. Lectures will be recorded and posted on Blackboard. Students are encouraged to view them at a time convenient for them.Sessions will be held at the specified lecture time (Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:30-10:45)to review content and encourage student interaction. Office hours with your instructor and teaching assistants will take place through an online conference system, such as Blackboard Collaborate or Zoom, and are not required.

BIOS 350 (Gibbons): General Microbiology

  • Course Description: An introduction to the morphology, staining, genetics, physiology and biochemistry of microbial life. Medical significance of bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, algae and helminthes. The significance of viruses, prions, and viroids.
  • This course is fully online and asynchronous, including exams, and there are no on campus meeting times. Office hours with your instructor and teaching assistants will take place through an online conference system, such as Blackboard Collaborate or Zoom, and are not required. They will be recorded for those who wish to attend but cannot.

BIOS-352/CHEM-352 (Jeffrery & Polikanov): Introductory Biochemistry

  • Course Description: The course covers the following topics: structure and function of cellular constituents; enzymology; metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleotides; molecular biology of biosynthesis of proteins and nucleic acids.
  • This course is fully online and asynchronous, including exams, and there are no on-campus meeting times. Office hours with the instructors and teaching assistants will take place through an online conference system, such as Blackboard Collaborate or Zoom, and are not required. They will be recorded for those who wish to attend but cannot.

BIOS 420 (Lynch): Genomics

  • Course Description: In this course, students will gain hands-on experience in generating and analyzing large-scale genome wide sequence data.
  • For Fall 2020 there will be a hybrid remote/in person organization of the course.  For the computational portion of the class, we will meet synchronously at the scheduled time through Blackboard, where there will be short lectures, discussion time, and student presentations. Official meeting time will also be used for live troubleshooting.  In addition, there will be six wet-bench, in person, sessions.  The class will be split in half, one half will begin the wet bench module where a Next Generation Sequencing library will be prepared, while the other half will work remotely and asynchronously on a computational project related to the wet lab.  At the end of six sessions, the two cohorts will switch tasks (wet lab to computational and vice versa) for the next 6 meeting sessions.  Individual and group meetings will be scheduled to check and facilitate progress for the students working remotely.

BIOS 480 (Wise):  Introduction to Modern Biostatistics with R

  • Course Description:  An introduction to research design, data visualization, and modern approaches to statistical modeling of univariate biological data (“univariate” = one response variable in an experimental or observational research study).  All work done in R, an open-source statistical computing language that will be introduced in the first week’s Lab  and taught throughout the course. It will be assumed that students have taken NO previous course in statistics and do NOT know the R language.Nevertheless, this course will be valuable if you have already taken a statistics course, because BIOS 480 introduces two core concepts of modern biostatistics absent from most introductory courses: (1) the “New Statistics,” which focuses on effect size and de-emphasizes “Null Hypothesis Significance Testing”; and (2) the general Linear Model,  a fundamental concept of modern biostatistics.
  • This course is fully online and synchronous. Attendance via internet is required. The Lecture-Discussion section will introduce core concepts, with questions and discussion an integral part of the meeting. The Lab section will emphasize hands-on exercises with real data. Short quizzes will be given during scheduled class meeting times. Exams will be open-book, to be taken outside of scheduled class time, but with a time limit from start to finish, to be started at a time selected by the student within an assigned 24-hour window. Office hours with Prof. Wise and his graduate teaching assistant will take place through an online conference system, such as Blackboard Collaborate or Zoom, and are not required. There will be an option to meet with Prof. Wise in person during scheduled office hours if an appointment is made ahead of time so that only one student at a time is present in his office.

BIOS 482 (Chang): Molecular and Developmental Neurobiology Laboratory

  • Course Description: Elucidating the mind’s inner workings is one of the remaining challenges facing neuroscientists today. Since Ramón y Cajal’s first illustrations of neuronal structures, neuroscientists have benefited from new ways to visualize and understand the microscopic components within the brain. The implement of modern, advanced techniques holds the promise for elucidating a better understanding of the how the brain works. Already, many of these tools offer researchers novel methods for peering into the structure and function of the brain. This course (BioS 482) will explore the most recent neurotechniques and how these are being used to advance our knowledge of the brain.
  • During this course, the lecturers will:
    • Provide an overview of new neurotechniques, including high power fluorescent microscopy, optogenetic manipulation of neuronal circuits, whole genome sequencing, and laser surgery.
    • Present recent research using these new technologies
    • Shed light on how to use these new technologies to advance research
  • Suggested text: Principles of Neural Science, 5th Edition, by Kandel et al., McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing 2012.
  • Attendance Policy:Attendance is expected at all scheduled classes. All the lectures given on Monday will be online synchronous. For the lab practices given on Wednesday, half will be online synchronous, and half will be in person. But the TA will make those “in-person” lab practices online synchronous as well so people can’t come in person can still do online synchronously.

BIOS 489 (Logan): Cellular Neurobiology Lab

  • Course Description: The course will introduce key concepts in neurotransmission through computer simulations and both instructor-led as well as hands on experimentation in order for the learner to gain an understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying neurotransmission and, ultimately, behavior.
  • This course is fully online and will have a mixture of synchronous and asynchronous exercises. Details of when synchronous activities are planned will be available through the syllabus, but students should plan to be available for the times that the course is listed. There are no on campus meeting times although we will need to arrange a one time event both for pick up and for drop off of the equipment that is to be used at home for the semester. Synchronous exercises will take place through an online conference system, such as Blackboard Collaborate or Zoom, and are required. They will be recorded to be viewed as desired.
  • Required software: Students are required to have a computer with a secure and reliable internet connection and must have the most up to date version of the Internet browser, Chrome or Firefox, on their computer along with a functioning webcam. There are two required programs that the students will download and use. One is Neurons in Action, an interactive program downloadablefrom Sinauer/Oxford University Press (~$40) that will allow us to explore the fundamentals of neurophysiology through tutorials and simulations. In addition, students will need to download ImageJ and Java which is free and available for Macs and PCs at the following link: https://imagej.nih.gov/ij/download.html

 

BIOS Undergraduate Advisors